yutopia tropiko

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Source: http://pussykrew.niochnioszki.net/

“[E]motional growth is a form of epistemic training as well. When we speak of collective political struggles and oppositional social movements, we can see how the political is continuous with the epistemological. In fact one may interpret Marx’s famous eleventh thesis on Feuerbach as making just such an epistemological argument. It does not urge us to give up the job of interpreting the world (in the interest of changing it) but instead points out how the possibility of interpreting our world accurately depends fundamentally on our coming to know what it would take to change it, on our identifying the central relations of power and privilege that sustain it and make the world what it is. And we learn to identify these relations through our various attempts to change the world, not merely to contemplate it as it is.”

— Satya Mohanty (via matryushka)

“It is perfectly possible-indeed, it is far from uncommon-to go to bed one night, or wake up one morning, or simply walk through a door one has known all one’s life, and discover, between inhaling and exhaling, that the self one has sewn together with such effort is all dirty rags, is unusable, is gone: and out of what raw material will one build a self again?”

— James Baldwin
thx 4 tha baby pancakes, kenji
:)))
none of them shall be spared

thx 4 tha baby pancakes, kenji

:)))

none of them shall be spared

English is my mother tongue

A mother tongue is not a foreign

lang lang lang language

languish anguish

a foreign anguish

English is my father tongue

a father tongue is a foreign language

therefore English is a foreign language

not a mother tongue

what is my mother tongue

my mammy tongue

my mummy tongue

my momsy tongue

my modder tongue

my ma tongue

I have no mother tongue

no mother to tongue

no tongue to mother tongue me

I must therefore be tongue-dumb

dub tongued

damn dumb tongue

but I have a dumb tongue

tongue dumb

father tongue

and English is my mother tongue

is my father tongue

is a foreign lan lang lang language

languish anguish

a foreign anguish is English

shuraleh:

Gaston Bachelard, The Poetics of Space

shuraleh:

Gaston Bachelard, The Poetics of Space

I’ve had enough
I’m sick of seeing and touching
Both sides of things
Sick of being the damn bridge for everybody

Nobody
Can talk to anybody
Without me
Right?

I explain my mother to my father my father to my little sister
My little sister to my brother my brother to the white feminists
The white feminists to the Black church folks the Black church folks
To the ex-hippies the ex-hippies to the Black separatists the
Black separatists to the artists the artists to my friends’ parents…

Then
I’ve got to explain myself
To everybody

I do more translating
Than the Gawdamn U.N.

Forget it
I’m sick of it

I’m sick of filling in your gaps

Sick of being your insurance against
The isolation of your self-imposed limitations
Sick of being the crazy at your holiday dinners
Sick of being the odd one at your Sunday Brunches
Sick of being the sole Black friend to 34 individual white people

Find another connection to the rest of the world
Find something else to make you legitimate
Find some other way to be political and hip

I will not be the bridge to your womanhood
Your manhood
Your human-ness

I’m sick of reminding you not to
Close off too tight for too long

I’m sick of mediating with your worst self
On behalf of your better selves

I am sick
Of having to remind you
To breathe
Before you suffocate
Your own fool self

Forget it
Stretch or drown
Evolve or die

The bridge I must be
Is the bridge to my own power
I must translate
My own fears
Mediate
My own weaknesses

I must be the bridge to nowhere
But my true self
And then
I will be useful

— "The Bridge Poem," Donna Kate Rushin

Rabih Alameddine in Koolaids: The Art of War:

In America, I fit, but I do not belong.
In Lebanon, I belong, but I do not fit. 

Where do you fit and not belong, or belong and not fit?

I belong to myself, but I try to fit where I can make myself useful.

-Harryette Mullen interviewed by Maryam Monalisa Gharavi

“It was difficult to see and hear those words repeated, in media reports, articles, military and even White House briefings: ‘The Filipino people are resilient.’ A characterization which should raise anyone’s hackles, with its image of a jelly blob, quivering when punched, then quieting back to what it was before the rain of blows: sans sharpness, inert and passive, non-evaluating of what happens to its self.

No, we are not resilient.

We break, when the world is just too much, and in the process of breaking, are transformed into something difficult to understand. Or we take full measure of misfortune, wrestle with it and emerge transformed into something equally terrifying.”